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Facilities Management honored for excellence

The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus has received the 2017 Award for Excellence in Facilities Management from APPA: Leadership in Educational Facilities, an organization that promotes leadership in educational facilities for professionals seeking to build their careers, transform their institutions, and elevate the value and recognition of facilities in education.

The Award for Excellence, which highlights the essential role of facilities operations in the overall institutional mission and vision, is APPA’s highest institutional honor.  Recipient institutions gain national and international recognition for their outstanding achievements in facilities management. The Award for Excellence designation is valid for a period of five years.

Anschutz Medical Campus
CU Anschutz Medical Campus

“The institutions that receive the Award for Excellence are true leaders in educational facilities management,” said Paul Wuebold, vice president of Professional Affairs for APPA and the chair of the Awards and Recognition Committee.  “In the span of twenty years, the University of Colorado has converted a 233 acre former military hospital in Aurora, Colo., into a world-class research medical campus.  The CU Anschutz Facilities Management department emphasizes communication within its staff, with the administration and with its customers to positively respond to and remedy any issues that are raised.”

The APPA Award for Excellence is designed to recognize and advance excellence in the field of educational facilities.  Award for Excellence nominations address the areas of: leadership; strategic and operational planning; customer focus; information and analysis; development and management of human resources; process management; and performance results. Nominated institutions also submit to a site review conducted by an awards evaluation team.

“It is an honor to receive APPA’s Award for Excellence,” said David Turnquist, associate vice chancellor, Facilities Management at CU Anschutz. “To be considered the Best of the Best is a tribute to the work, dedication and professionalism of the Facilities Management staff and the incredible support of the executive leadership at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.”

Universidad Panamericana Mexico also was honored with the 2017 Award for Excellence.

Leadership from CU Anschutz Facilities Management was recognized on July 22 during the awards banquet at the 2017 APPA Annual Conference in San Francisco.

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Major communication gaps between doctors and home health care nurses revealed

Researchers at the University of  Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found serious gaps in communication between physicians and home health care agencies (HHC) responsible for caring for often elderly patients discharged from hospitals. The problem, the study said, can contribute to hospital readmissions.

The research, published today in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, cites an array of communication challenges between HHC agencies and physicians following hospital discharge.

Dr. Christine Jones, assistant professor of medicine and lead author of the study.
Dr. Christine Jones, MD, MS, assistant professor of medicine and lead author of the study.

The study cited frequent discrepancies in medication lists, confusion over who was responsible to write patient care orders, inaccessible hospital records and resistance from clinicians and staff for accountability.

Led by Christine D. Jones, MD, MS, assistant professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, the researchers conducted six focus groups with HHC nurses from six different agencies in Colorado to ask about their general experience with caring for patients after discharge from any of their referring hospitals.

“We found that communication breakdowns can have consequences for patients,” said Jones, lead author of the study. “These are some of our most fragile patients, most are over 65, and more seamless communication is needed.”

Some of the HHC nurses interviewed complained of a lack of accountability, medical errors and difficulty in reaching doctors.

“As a general rule, I’ve been told you’re not to contact the hospitals. I actually got in trouble for contacting the hospital, trying to find out, get more information, trying to track a doctor down,” one nurse said in a focus group.

Another nurse said even if they reach a primary care physician, they often say they didn’t know the patient was in the hospital and they don’t have a report on them.

“The communication between the hospital and the primary care providers is just as bad as it is for us because the PCP’s don’t have the information,” the nurse said.

Dr. Jones said another complicating factor is that insurance often requires doctors to order HHC services. So if a nurse practitioner is providing primary care for a patient, obtaining HHC immediately becomes more difficult.

The researchers found another serious problem when it came to ordering medication. HHC nurses and staff said most of the medication lists they receive are incorrect due to the number of doctors and specialties involved.

“As hospitalists, we need to think about what happens beyond the hospital walls and how we can support our patients after discharge, especially when it comes to home health care patients who can be very vulnerable.” Jones said.

She noted that the study did not focus on any one specific hospital, but hospitals in general.

The study proposes a series of solutions to these problems including the following:

  • Hospitals and primary care physicians could provide HHC agencies direct access to Electronic Medical Records and direct phone lines to doctors.
  • Enact laws allowing nurse practitioners and physician’s assistants to write HHC orders. A bill was under consideration to do this but was not acted upon by Congress.
  • Clearly establishing accountability for hospital clinicians to manage HHC orders until a primary care physician can see a patient and help HHC nurses with questions.
  • Create better communication methods with PCPs to ensure safer transitions

“Our findings suggest that improvements to accountability and communication could address patient needs and goals, avoid medication discrepancies and ultimately improve safety for patients and HHC nurses,” Dr. Jones said.

 

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Center for Women’s Health Research holds career day for high school girls

Participants of the ‘Exploring Healthcare Careers for High School-Aged Girls’ event, hosted by the CWHR, practice suturing techniques at the Center for Surgical Innovation
Participants in the ‘Exploring Healthcare Careers for High School-Aged Girls’ event, hosted by the CWHR, practice suturing techniques at the Center for Surgical Innovation

On June 8, the Center for Women’s Health Research (CWHR) and UCHealth partnered to host the third annual “Exploring Healthcare Careers for High School-Aged Girls,” an interactive learning opportunity for high school girls interested in exploring healthcare and science careers. The day-long program offered 60 young women the chance to visit the CU Anschutz Medical Campus, attend lectures and Q&A sessions and participate in hands-on learning experiences to gain insight into the working lives of scientists and healthcare professionals.

After a mother-daughter breakfast and welcoming remarks by CWHR Director Judy Regensteiner, the participants spent their morning visiting the Gates Biomanufacturing Facility and the Center for Surgical Innovation (CSI). At the Gates Biomanufacturing Facility, they observed how lab discoveries translate into cell therapies; at CSI, they experimented with suturing techniques on a variety of tissues. Various researchers and surgical residents explained their different roles at Gates and CSI, and described the diverse and sometimes unpredictable paths they took to get there.

At lunch, the participants were treated to an insightful lecture by Dr. Anne Libby, Vice Chair for Academic Affairs, who discussed the five indicators of talent that can lead to thoughtful, satisfying career choices: yearning, satisfaction, rapid learning, glimpses of excellence, and flow. “In choosing a career path,” she told the girls, “don’t ask yourselves what you want to be. Ask yourselves who you are, and how you can become more you.” A psychiatrist and nurse practitioner from the Johnson Depression Center also spoke to the girls about careers in behavioral health.

The afternoon’s activities included a visit to the Cardiac and Vascular Center’s heart catheter lab, where the girls saw simulated demonstrations of heart catheterization and expanded their knowledge of the various options for professions in cardiology.

The day ended with presentations by athletic trainers from the Sports Medicine Department at Children’s Hospital Colorado, who discussed the options for individuals interested in sports medicine careers. When the day’s activities came to a close, many of the girls expressed their gratitude and excitement at the insights they had gained after exposure to so many career options on campus.

“It opened my mind to a health-centered career,” one participant said. “Before, I simply wanted to do engineering, but now medical school seems interesting too.”

Another, reiterating Dr. Libby’s message, came to the following conclusion: “The best part about the day was realizing that there is no ideal way to get anywhere – you just have to be yourself and follow your heart and it will lead you to where you need to be.”

The CWHR is looking forward to hosting the event again next year.

Guest Contributor:  Andrew Weaver, Public Relations and Community Education Coordinator, Center for Women’s Health Research

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Senior Executives from Film and Virtual Reality Industries Join NBHIC

The National Behavioral Health Innovation Center announced today that Rick Rekedal, a former senior executive with DreamWorks Animation, and Dr. Walter Greenleaf, a pioneer and leading authority on virtual reality for medical use, have joined its staff.

Rick Rekedal joins NBHIC as Senior Creative Advisor
Rick Rekedal joins NBHIC as Senior Creative Advisor

“Walter and Rick are recognized internationally as leaders in their fields,” said Matt Vogl, executive director of NBHIC at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. “Their knowledge and insight are powerful assets to our mission of finding bold new solutions to the country’s mental health crisis.”

In 2016, Rekedal completed over 20 years with DreamWorks as Chief Creative of franchise development and the global franchise director of the hit movie “Trolls.” Rekedal has also worked on properties such as “How To Train Your Dragon,” “Shrek,” “Kung Fu Panda,” and “The Lost World: Jurassic Park,” developing merchandising, interactive and licensing programs. Rekedal’s work has been recognized with two Annie Awards, two Kids Choice Awards and Toy of the Year. He is a frequent speaker and serves on advisory boards for The Wedgwood Circle; Michael W. Smith Group and Seabourne Pictures; and Belmont University’s film school.

Dr. Walter Greenleaf is NBHIC’s new Director of Technology Strategy
Dr. Walter Greenlef joins NBHIC as Director of Technology Strategy

Rekedal joins NBHIC as Senior Creative Advisor, consulting on how to elevate an open and urgent national conversation on mental health.

Greenleaf is a behavioral neuroscientist and a medical product developer who has been on the cutting edge of virtual reality and augmented reality applications in healthcare for more than 30 years.

In his role as NBHIC’s Director of Technology Strategy, Greenleaf brings his considerable knowledge to the Center’s approach to digital initiatives. He continues to work as a Visiting Scholar at the Stanford University Virtual Human Interaction Lab.

He has developed several clinical product streams, founded medical companies, and served as a scientific advisor and reviewer for the U.S. Public Health Service, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, NASA and the U.S. Department of Education. He holds a PhD in Neuro and Bio-behavioral Sciences from Stanford University.

“Our approach is to seek out unexpected partners as we look beyond the current mental health system for new solutions,” said Vogl. “Walter and Rick fit that approach. Walter’s depth of knowledge in virtual reality and Silicon Valley are leading us to work with new technology partners in developing cutting edge tools for mental health treatments. Rick’s extraordinary creative abilities can help steer powerful human connections to combat the awful stigma that is so harmful to many people in need.”

Guest contributor: Lauren Baker, marketing and communications strategist for the National Behavioral Health Innovation Center at CU Anschutz.

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Immune system may keep body from neutralizing HIV-1 virus

Researchers at the University of  Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have discovered that a process protecting the body from autoimmune disease appears to prevent it from creating antibodies that can neutralize the HIV-1 virus, a finding that could possibly help lead to a vaccine that stimulates production of these antibodies.

Dr. Raul Torres, professor of immunology and microbiology at CU Anschutz
Raul Torres, PhD, professor of immunology and microbiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

The study, led by Raul M. Torres, PhD, professor of immunology and microbiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, was published Tuesday in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Torres and his team sought to better understand how the body’s own immune system might be getting in the way of neutralizing the HIV-1 virus.

They knew that some patients infected with HIV-1 developed what are known as ‘broadly neutralizing antibodies,’ or bnAbs, that can protect against a wide variety of HIV-1 strains by recognizing a protein on the surface of the virus called Env. But the patients only develop these antibodies after many years of infection.

Because of shared features found in a number of HIV-1 bnAbs, researchers suspected the inability or delayed ability to make these type of protective antibodies against HIV was due to the immune system suppressing production of the antibodies to prevent the body from creating self-reactive antibodies that could cause autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus.

At the same time, patients with lupus showed slower rates of HIV-1 infection. Scientists believe that’s because these autoimmune patients produce self-reactive antibodies that recognize and neutralize HIV-1.

The process by which the body prevents the creation of antibodies that can cause autoimmune disease is known as immunological tolerance.

Torres wanted to break through that tolerance and stimulate the production of antibodies that could neutralize HIV-1.

“We wanted to see if people could make a protective response to HIV-1 without the normal restraint imposed by the immune system to prevent autoimmunity,” Torres said.

The researchers first tested mice with genetic defects that caused lupus-like symptoms. They found that many of them produced antibodies that could neutralize HIV-1 after being injected with alum, a chemical that promotes antibody secretion and is often used in vaccinations.

Next, they treated normal mice with a drug that impairs immunological tolerance and found that they began producing antibodies capable of neutralizing HIV-1. The production of these antibodies was increased by alum injections. And if the mice were also injected with the HIV-1 protein Env, they produced potent broadly neutralizing antibodies capable of neutralizing a range of HIV-1 strains.

In every case, the production of these HIV-neutralizing antibodies correlated with the levels of a self-reactive antibody that recognizes a chromosomal protein called Histone H2A. The researchers confirmed these antibodies could neutralize HIV-1.

“We think this may reflect an example of molecular mimicry where the virus has evolved to mimic or look like a self protein,” Torres said.

Torres suggested that the difficulty in developing a vaccine against HIV-1 may be because of the ability of the virus to camouflage itself as a normal part of the body.

“But breaching peripheral immunological tolerance permits the production of cross-reactive antibodies able to neutralize HIV-1,” Torres said.

Since the research was done on animals, scientists must still determine its relevance for HIV-1 immunity in humans.

“The primary consideration will be determining whether immunological tolerance can be temporarily relaxed without leading to detrimental autoimmune manifestations and as a means to possibly elicit HIV-1 bnAbs with vaccination,” he said.

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Dr. Jonathan Samet is new dean of Colorado School of Public Health

Following an extensive national search, the chancellor of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Don Elliman, announced Tuesday the hiring of Dr. Jonathan Samet, MD, MS, as the new dean of the Colorado School of Public Health.

Dr. Samet, an accomplished medical professional and administrator, has occupied top positions in leading universities around the country.

Dr. Jonathan Samet, new dean of the Colorado School of Public Health
Dr. Jonathan Samet is the new dean of the Colorado School of Public Health

He is currently distinguished professor and chair of the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. He also directs both the USC Institute for Global Health and the Workforce Development and KL2 Program of the Southern California Clinical and Translational Science Institute.

“I am honored by being selected as the third dean of the Colorado School of Public Health,” Dr. Samet said.  “A key goal will be to enhance the school’s impact on public health in the state and region through our research and training activities.”

Previously, he chaired the department of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and was clinical division chief for Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the University of New Mexico.

Chancellor Elliman said the new dean will strengthen and deepen the impact of the Colorado School of Public Health (ColoradoSPH).

“Since its establishment just nine years ago, the ColoradoSPH – a partnership of CU Anschutz, Colorado State University and the University of Northern Colorado – has made remarkable strides toward becoming one of the country’s premier institutions of public health,” Elliman said. “As its third dean, Dr. Samet, who brings the experience of a long and distinguished career in academic medicine and public health, is uniquely qualified to take the ColoradoSPH to new heights.”

Dr. Samet comes to ColoradoSPH with nearly 40 years of experience in education, health care and research.

Throughout his career, he’s fostered and mentored faculty members, created new lines of research, initiated curricular advances and maintained fiscal stability.

Along with teaching everyone from undergraduate to postdoctoral students, Dr. Samet has conducted a wide array of research into health issues.  In many cases, he’s translated that research into action. His work led to advancing tobacco controls nationally and around the world, tightening air quality regulations and winning compensation for underground uranium miners suffering health problems.

The new dean is past-president of the American College of Epidemiology and the Society of Epidemiologic Research. He was elected to the National Academy of Medicine, one of the highest honors in medicine, and holds a bachelor’s degree from Harvard College, an MD from the University of Rochester and a master’s degree from the Harvard School of Public Health.

“We are fortunate to have someone as accomplished and versatile as Dr. Samet taking the helm of the Colorado School of Public Health at this critical juncture in its growth,” Chancellor Elliman said. “I am grateful to Dr. Elaine Morrato who, as interim dean since December, has helped the school continue to build on its momentum while ensuring we are set up for a smooth handoff to new leadership.”

Dr. Morrato, DrPH, MPH, will continue as interim dean until Dr. Samet assumes his new post in October.

 

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